Swimming in Waterfalls in Grenada

After St Barth, we endured another day at sea, however it was a lot better than lost time. The Caribbean seas are a lot quiet than that of the Atlantic making it plain sailing - ha! The relentless humming of the anchor being dropped awoke me once again. Where were we today? I flung open my curtains, I yelped in delight at the new view outside out cabin window. Sure, I could get used to a new scenery every day! And who cares about being woken up early each morning if it just really gives you more time to explore the island?

Out of my window I could see the jetty, with clear waters on either side. To the left I could see the bright orange rooves of the capital city, St George's. To the right was a hill covered in thick foliage. Then, in the distance lay rolling mountains, enticing me in with their enchanting beauty.

It was my first time in Grenada and I couldn't be more excited! The excursion we had planned today was the one I had been most looking forward to. It was called the 'Seven Sisters Waterfall' trail.

We departed our boat and walked down the jetty into St George's where we met our minivan. We jumped in and drove inland, into the thick vegetation.

View of the capital city, St George's from the jetty

Local houses in Grenada

An abandoned minivan at the edge of the jungle

I was absolutely fascinated by the landscape which we drove through. Lush green trees grew all around us with simple yet colourful houses nestled in between them. The island was very mountainous, with looming hills covered in forests poking from all directions.

I hadn't been to a Caribbean island that felt this magical. When I visit the Caribbean, the emphasis is more on the coastline with beaches being the key attraction. However, I was really loving venturing through the jungle and couldn't believe I'd been visiting this group of islands for so long without a trip like this.

As we ventured into the jungle, we waved goodbye to clear blue skies and welcomed the looming grey clouds, promising tropical downpours. We were in the rainforest now.

We arrived at the start of the trail. As we left our vehicle, I could feel the humidity closing in around me. My senses were alive with the unique, lush smells of all the jungle plants. We began walking along a small dirt trail that at first cut through a field. In the background were tall mountains and somewhere in there were the waterfalls.

One of our guides was carrying a clear plastic bag with biscuits in. I wasn't sure what this was for until two tabby cats approached us, tails raised in greeting and excited mews escaping their throats. The guide bent down and poured the biscuits onto the ground where the cats began to tuck into their feast.

We saw lots of exciting plants including pineapple plants growing little pineapples and plenty of banana trees. My favourite of all was a little plant that looking nothing out the ordinary. However, whenever you touched it, it's leaves would curl up. It was amazing!

A little pineapple growing!

They don't look too happy about sharing

Banana trees

A stray dog

Harvesting the fruit

That's a big fruit-cutting knife...

Eventually, we entered the jungle and were greeted with a torrential downpour. I was already starting to see why they call them 'rainforests'. However, as quickly as it started, it stopped and it wasn't long before rays of sunlight began to filter down through the canopy and onto the forest floor.

We followed a narrow path that wound through the forest, curving round trees and through trickling streams. The sound of birdsong was all around us with insects joining in. I really was falling in love with this place.

We arrived at the waterfalls! There were 2 waterfalls, one falling into another. In between the two was a lovely pool, it's water crystal clear and tantalisingly fresh.

There were smiling locals chilling beside the waterfalls. When we arrived, a few of them took to diving off the top of the higher waterfall and into the lagoon below. We watched, mesmerised as they took the jump without hesitation. They obviously were no amateurs to jumping off this waterfall.

When they finished it was our turn - no, not to jump, but to swim. The water was cold but it was a welcome relief after trekking through the jungle in the stifling heat. I swam through the icy water, heading towards the base of the waterfall. The closer I swam, the more tricky it became. The waterfall was creating a current, pushing everything away from it so battling against that strong current was incredibly challenging and I started to tire quite quickly.

Eventually, I made it! I swam underneath the waterfall, the cascade pouring down before me. I managed to grip the rock at the back, holding on for as long as I could. After a while I allowed myself to get drawn into the water and swam underneath the downfall of water, the icy drops falling onto my head like a very heavy shower.

Swimming back to the other end of the lagoon was easy. The waterfall just pushed me the whole way.

Swimming under the waterfall

After a nice, relaxing swim, it was time to head back. We retraced our steps and ended up at the minibus again. We were provided with ice creams and drinks - perfect! Then, it was time to head back to the boat.

It had been a truly amazing day in Grenada. The island sure was going to leave a lasting impression with me. I couldn't wipe the beaming smile off my face. I really couldn't believe that I'd just swam in a waterfall! That was one to tick off my bucket-list.

Our ship docked at St George's

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